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Use 3-D glasses to modify a camera for infrared

by umberto_rootman | May 17, 2020 06:42 17 May 06:42 | #23655 | #23655

This E 15.- camera has the IR block filter in back of the lens. The sensor is not attached to the mother board, so it has to be held in place with a wrench (15) when unscrewing the lens, which is weakly glued to the 12 mm holder. It is possible to do this mod without detaching ribbon cables , as the inner frame can be tilted halfway out. I use the 2 filters from 3 D glasses: cyan and red, and an IR filter ( a plastic filter from Edmund optics, but an old floppy disk would work).

The filter can be permanently glued in back of the lens, but i decided to buy a 37 mm filter kit, with 10 mostly rather useless filters. The ring holding the glass can be removed with a putty knife ground to 37 mm width.

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13 Comments

I often use an orange-red filter, handheld in from of the camera, from a scrapped enlarger. I do a white balance with the eye dropper tool in PS, Gimp or Lightzone, and swap the red and blue channel (plenty instructions on youtube) The orange filter allows some more color variety.

The cyan filter basically just swaps the red with IR, and allows all other colors to pass.

Wow that's cool if I put an IR Illuminator infront of my camera and solder it to a 9volt battery holder will this be able to get the camera to work during the night time?

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The great thing about using the cyan or blue filter with a modded sports cam is the ability to record images or video without having to resort to complicated image post processing.

Thanks for sharing this! Very cool. I don't think i've seen anyone discussing a cyan filter before, can you share a link to what you're using?

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As stated, the cyan filter was cut out from

IMG_20200517_132259.jpg

3-D glasses

PHO00004.JPG

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Thank you! Great pic of the glasses cut up!


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In the glare in the wind mill pic, left above, is a small spectrum visible, which illustrates which wavelengths are blocked by the filter: there is a gap between the blue and the pink (IR). It also illustrates focussing problems: these objective lenses are obviously not color corrected for the full range of 300- 1000 nm. The pics can be quite soft sometimes.

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What would you say to the idea of changing the title of this post to "use 3-D glasses to modify a sport cam for infrared" ?

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Excellent!

On Wed, May 20, 2020 at 5:55 PM \<notifications@publiclab.org> wrote:

Hi! There's been a response to your research note 'Cheap sports cam mod'. You can reply to this email or visit this link:

https://publiclab.org/notes/umberto_rootman/05-17-2020/cheap-sports-cam-mod#c26859

liz wrote:


What would you say to the idea of changing the title of this post to "use 3-D glasses to modify a sport cam for infrared" ?


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Super, just modified title to "Use 3-D glasses to modify a camera for infrared" -- this will help people understand what content is here when they see the title displayed elsewhere around the site. Thanks!


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IMG_20200521_081316.jpg

Another great source for infrared color photos: a Roscolux sample book of 200 filters, of which at least 50 - 80 filters are useful.

https://us.rosco.com/en/products/catalog/roscolux

I ordered mine at Edmund Optical for about E 30, including shipping. Not bad for that many filters! It is thin plastic foil material, and each filter has a sheet with its own spectral curve in the visual range. Clicking on the color squares on their website even gives more info. Its purpose is illumination in dance halls, concerts and theatres.

Some results are more esthetic than others (green skies are ugly), which does not always says much about its scientific or practical value.

Additional useful filters are: Floppy dics, 2 crossed polaroid filters and , surprisingly, some ND filters. Obviously, many pigments seem to be transparent in the IR, and many surprises can be expected...

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All pictures have undergone 'auto levels'. This particular camera does not have to be white balanced. For many cameras, one has to white balance with the eye dropper tool on a piece of vegetation.

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